4 Letter Glenwood Springs

Glenwood Springs, Colorado

July 20

Steve Wells

EDITOR’S NOTE ( of the paper)

Steve Wells is a contributing columnist whose views do not represent an editorial position for the Post Independent. For the other view, here’s a previously published guest opinion.

Warning: The following content is rated “S” for sarcasm.

Wow, just when I think a topic would be too well-known and boring, just the opposite is true. I thought that everybody knew about this toxic chemical. Entire continents ban this stuff, but this is America, and we like our way of life, even if it involves overingesting thousands of toxic chemicals.

What if two local personal trainers wearing white coats started publicly advocating that our local government should put sugar (a carbohydrate that is absolutely critical to human life) in the municipal water supply because they are the experts, and they learned from the people who sell sugar that people need sugar, and putting sugar in the water is the only way to save peoples’ lives? Would you fall for that?

That’s what I hear when dentists talk about the benefits of adding a fluoridation system to Rifle’s water supply.

Am I just jealous? Yes. Can I entice the public into spending an extra $200,000 more or less with painfully ignorant speculations, too? No, I couldn’t afford medical school.

Cozy, verifiable facts about fluoridation:

There is much more research that points to fluoride being a poison rather than a cure.

There is very little evidence that suggests that fluoride improves tooth health — and the vast majority of the research is about fluoride used topically, not ingested.

And yes, the research that barely shows not a nonbenefit to brushing fluoride into your bloodstream via your gums is paid for by the people that sell it, so it’s reliable for sure.

You are instructed to call poison control if you swallow a pea-sized amount of fluoride toothpaste. This is about the amount of fluoride that’s in an 8-ounce glass of typical fluoridated municipal water. Does that tell you anything? Read your toothpaste label. There is no such warning on mine because I don’t use fluoridated toothpaste, and I have not had even a teensy weensy cavity in over 30 years. I stopped getting them after I stopped using toothpaste with fluoride and other helpful FDA-approved chemicals.

The fluoride added to municipal water supplies is a toxic byproduct from another terribly toxic, overused but patriotic chemical substance, fertilizer. It’s patriotic because we use it in the heartland of America to make genetically modified corn and soybeans so we can make more biofuels and tofu — because that makes sense. What better way to get rid of it than municipal water supplies? That’s how we get rid of most toxic chemicals; we just wash them away with a little water and they go away forever.

Fluoride is not a nutrient; no biochemical process in the human body needs fluoride.

Many elements are found in surface water that we shouldn’t drink. Just because fluoride occurs in certain rocks and in variable levels among ground water samples does not mean that we should add it to everyone’s water without their consent. This is drugging people without their consent, which I understand is very popular these days with the celebrities we idolize.

The effectiveness of swallowing fluoride to reduce tooth decay has never been demonstrated by a randomized control trial — this is standard for all drugs. So let’s dump it in our water.

If you want fluoride, use fluoridated toothpaste — it’s your right. Let us choose to put what we want into our own bodies regardless of what so-called experts think “might be good” for public health, maybe. That’s why we have the Constitution and the Bill of Rights — to prevent people in power from doing stuff like this.

Is it not bad enough that they dump enough chlorine in our water to sanitize an L.A. public pool? For a bunch of people who say they like freedom, we sure are quick to give it up.

Other possible reasons for poorly toothed local residents:

It’s definitely not everybody’s awesome diet. No chance. Impossible. The acids formed by the breakdown of sugars is what demineralizes your teeth. There are more than 15 fast food restaurants in the same market as the gyms that I work in, but nobody wants to do anything about that because of the following mathematical constant:

Fast food restaurants = more tax revenue = fluoridation system = more dental visits = more money.

There is no way that it’s the copious amount of chlorine in the water that’s affecting teeth. The disruption of essential minerals is directly correlated with tooth decay and the calcification of tissues within the body like our arteries and glands, particularly the pineal gland. What do you get when you mix hard water with chlorine? Scaling, calcification and eventual blockage. What do you think it’s doing to your body?

It’s definitely not poor hygiene habits. This has absolutely nothing to do with tooth decay.

It for sure couldn’t be the expense of dental care in hard-working, blue-collar towns that are contributing to poor dental health. Dental care is somehow different than health care and therefore not covered under the Affordable Care Act, which is somehow twice the price of the unaffordable health care that you had a few years ago. Sorry, I warned you about the sarcasm.

Steve Wells is a personal trainer and co-owner of Midland Fitness. His column appears on Tuesdays.

 

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